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WARDC

Low income women cry to Ambode over poor maternal healthcare

Saturday, December 30, 2017

Women in Lagos State have cried out to Governor Akinwunmi Ambode over what they described as the exorbitant cost of accessing maternal healthcare in government-owned medical facilities in the state, demanding that the state government redefine the term ‘free healthcare’ which it claims to be offering to expectant women.
 

Low-income women seek government’s intervention on maternal mortality

Saturday, December 16, 2017

Women in Lagos State have called on the government to provide quality medical care, especially for low-income women at the grassroots, to protect their human right to life.
 
They also agitate for improved healthcare system, timely response to emergencies and detailed costing of drugs and other medical charges that do not come free.This charge was made yesterday at a town hall meeting organised by the Women Advocate Research and Documentation Centre (WARDC) with low-income women and government health care providers.
 

WARDC tasks lawyers on litigation of maternal death cases

Thursday, October 12, 2017

Annually,  for every 100,000 live births in Nigeria, 630 women die. While the country has a maternal death rate second only to India, medical and social reasons are usually touted as the cause for these deaths rather than preventable factors such as poorly equipped health facilities and negligence on the part of healthcare professionals; hence, the consideration of such deaths as simply health issues rather than a violation of fundamental human rights such as rights to life and family life.