Maternal Mortality

Gynaecologists link high maternal, child mortality to traditional delivery methods

Sunday, December 24, 2017

Worried by increase in number of women coming down with fistula health condition in the country, gynaecologists have called for abolition of traditional birth attendance.
 
Rather, pregnant women are urged to attend antenatal care in primary healthcare and other recognised hospitals, as this would help to reduce cases of prolonged obstructed labours, which are the major cause of obstetric fistula.
 

NotAgain Campaign: Raising Government Awareness on Maternal Health in Nigeria

Friday, December 22, 2017

Nigeria, a country of abundant resources and a leading role in African affairs, still struggles with one of the highest maternal mortality ratios worldwide. Although maternal deaths have declined globally since 1990, about 100 Nigerian women die each day while giving birth.
 
The vast disparity between the rich and the poor in the country contributes to the marginalization of the problem. Leaving the most vulnerable to a low provision of accessible healthcare and nutrition, the disparity has been reported to be the largest among 16 other African countries.
 

Katsina records 340 maternal deaths annually; Daura tops chart – Report

Thursday, December 21, 2017

No fewer than 340 women of reproductive age die from maternal deaths in Katsina State annually, 25 less than the 365 recorded in 2016 in the state, with Daura Local Government recording the highest— 54 deaths.

Low-income women seek government’s intervention on maternal mortality

Saturday, December 16, 2017

Women in Lagos State have called on the government to provide quality medical care, especially for low-income women at the grassroots, to protect their human right to life.
 
They also agitate for improved healthcare system, timely response to emergencies and detailed costing of drugs and other medical charges that do not come free.This charge was made yesterday at a town hall meeting organised by the Women Advocate Research and Documentation Centre (WARDC) with low-income women and government health care providers.
 

100 women died from pregnancy complications in Zamfara in 2016 – Consultant

Tuesday, December 12, 2017

About 100 women were recorded to have died in Zamfara in 2016 due to pregnancy related complications, a medical consultant with the Federal Medical Centre, Gusau, Abubakar Danladi, disclosed.
 
Mr. Danladi disclosed this on Tuesday in his presentation at a one-day meeting of Civil Society Organisations, CSOs, and the media on maternal mortality in the state, organised by the Advocacy Nigeria Network, an NGO.
 

Community Where Pregnant Women Prefer Traditional Birth Attendants

Saturday, December 9, 2017

Shakitat Yakubu is 33 years old. She is a resident of Agboyi, a community in the Agboyi-Ketu Local Council Development Area (LCDA) in Kosofe Local Government of Lagos State.

 

Yakubu, a mother of three, is expecting her fourth child as she is eight months pregnant. But rather than attend one of the numerous Primary Health Care (PHC) Centres that dot the area for her antenatal, Yakubu patronises Mama Nurat, one of the Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs) in the community.

Dearth of Skilled Birth Attendants Responsible for Maternal Deaths, Says Expert

Sunday, November 26, 2017

The President of the Society of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Prof. Oluwarotimi Akinola, Sunday said Nigeria is occupying a pathetic position in the number of women that die during child birth, attributing the problem to dearth of skilled birth attendants.
 
Speaking during an interview with journalists in Sokoto, Akinola noted with deep concern the high rate of maternal deaths in the country, with Nigeria contributing 14 per cent to all the women that die in the world.
 

Sogunro: Lagos community where Pregnant Women Die Giving Birth

Saturday, November 25, 2017

It was about midday in the sleepy town called Sogunro Community. Quietness pervaded the environment as if there were no human lives present. It was later discovered that most of the residents had either gone to their offices out of town or had gone about their business and trades. For the housewives or older residents; they were either resting in their own homes or just minding their individual business.
 
 

I Was Scared My Son Might Contact HIV Virus From Breast Milk- Maimuna

Friday, November 24, 2017

Ajayi Maimuna is a young mother in her 30’s. She became HIV positive after her first three children and it remains a puzzle to her how she contacted the disease.
 
Maimuna, who spoke to our correspondent at the Heart to Heart Centre,(H2H) of the Badagry General Hospital, Lagos State, said, “I was scared my son might contact the HIV virus and as a result of that, I only breastfed him for one month and three days.
 

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