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Wellbeing Foundation Africa

Commonly used drug may be key to stopping thousands of mothers dying

Friday, November 10, 2017

Roughly every six minutes, a woman somewhere in the world bleeds to death in child birth. But a new medical trial shows that there is a way of combating the problem.
 
The trial has found that a simple drug called tranexamic acid, a blood clot stabiliser first discovered in Japan in the 1950s, could cut deaths from bleeding by a third if given to women within three hours.
 

WBFA advocates for improved supply chains and access to family planning in Africa

Thursday, July 13, 2017

The Wellbeing Foundation Africa and its Founder and President Toyin  Ojora-Saraki participated in the Family Planning Summit 2017 in London,  United Kingdom from Monday 10 July to Tuesday 11 July.
 
The summit was  organised by the United Nations Population Fund, Bill and Melinda Gates  Foundation and the UK Department of International Development to discuss  efforts to reach Family Planning 2020 goals and ensure that around the  world women and girls are better able to plan their families and their  futures.
 

Midwives key to rural women’s health – Mrs Saraki

Saturday, May 20, 2017

Mrs Toyin Saraki, Founder and President of the Wellbeing Foundation Africa (WBFA) has advocated for training and equipping of midwives as they hold the key to health of rural women in Nigeria.
 
Speaking at the wrap up of a two weeks advocacy and sensitisation on the roles of midwives in Nigeria, Mrs Saraki said that women encounter midwives more than doctors.
 
She said that in the rural areas, a well trained and equipped midwife would educate the rural woman on many health issues that concern them.